WorkConnect Security Controls

SAP is committed to promoting a secure online environment that will help you navigate your next career move via the WorkConnect platform. It is our utmost priority that the WorkConnect brand instills confidence and a sense of security. That is why all user data is protected by stringent controls and a dedicated team of specialists who research, track, and monitor all user activities on the WorkConnect.io web site. This team makes every effort to prevent the abuse of user data. Despite the rigorous security controls that we have put in place, the WorkConnect online platform, as with all online platforms, may be susceptible to fraudulent activity. For example, it is possible for scammers to purchase a subscription to WorkConnect and post fake job opportunities to collect personal data from applicants. Our team is actively patrolling the job board to catch these fraudulent job posts, as well as carefully screening subscribers. We also ask that you report any incidents so we can address the situation immediately. It is also possible that a scammer might send unsolicited emails to members of the WorkConnect community, signed by the WorkConnect team, or under the façade of the WorkConnect brand. In this case, we ask that you use caution when sharing personal information via email. We assure you, anyone caught committing fraudulent activity is in violation of our Terms of Use and subject to legal penalty. To help ensure a safe job search, we have compiled a list of frequently asked questions to educate you on how to protect yourself. We ask that you familiarize yourself with this information and follow the simple precautions mentioned to ensure the security of your data.

Frequently Asked Questions

What precautions can I take to protect myself from identify theft in the job search process?

With most job applications being completed online, the unfortunate reality is that online job seekers are a target for scammers seeking to commit identify theft. But there are plenty of ways that you can protect your personal information during the job hunt. Here are some general guidelines we recommend you follow:

  1. Be very careful with the personal information you share. Never include your social security number, driver's license number and date of birth on your resume.
  2. Watch out for the signs of fake job post. We have outlined several signs to watch out for in our answer to the next question.
  3. Trust your gut. If something seems suspicious or too good to be true, investigate further.
  4. Always do your research before applying. Search the company online, check out the company website (if the company doesn’t have one that should certainly give you pause), and make sure the contact details on the website match the job post. If you are suspicious about emails you receive, we recommend calling the company to verify that the individual is employed there.

What is a phising scam?

Phishing scams are cleverly disguised communications through which scammers attempt to acquire personal information. These scams most commonly show up in the form of email messages, but may also appear through instant messages, text messages, and even in phone calls. These phishing messages are designed to appear as though they were sent by a legitimate company. In email phishing, scammers will usually forge the sender email address to make it appear to be from the company or person the scammer is pretending to be. They will also use logos and graphics from the legitimate company's web site and create an email which looks similar or identical to actual messages the company might send. In such cases, it may be helpful to review email headers lines. Header lines are the first part of any email message before the body. The header lines contain information used to route message, including the subject, sender, recipient, the path an email takes, and its priority. Header lines are normally not shown raw and in full by email programs. Only certain information — the Subject line, sender and sent date, for instance — is displayed, formatted for easy use. When wondering the credibility of an email, it is a good idea to review these header lines, as they often will display suspicious information. To learn how to display the header lines of an email, check out this helpful guide.

How do I recognize a fake job post?

There are several signs to watch out for that suggest that a post may be fake:

  1. Job experience and resumes/CVs aren’t required. This is an obvious one, but don’t be fooled by flattery.
  2. The job opportunity requires you to pay money. Whether it be for a work visa, travel expense, software, training, background, or credit check, etc., asking for a fee in advance is a tell-tale sign of a scam.
  3. Job requirements and job description are vague. Job requirements are usually quite specific. Scammers will include job requirements to make the job post look professional, but the requirements are oddly simple. For example, you must be a citizen or must be at least 18 years of age. Legitimate job opportunities will require some experience or qualifications. Fake job posts typically do not have clear job descriptions either.
  4. The company is questionable. Make sure you research the company by searching online or calling them to verify that they’re a legitimate employer. If there is a company website (be extra cautious if there isn’t), compare the contact details to those offered in the job post. Some scammers will use a company name that is very similar to a reputable company, so carefully check the name. You can also check organizations like The Better Business Bureau and The Federal Trade Commission to see if the company has been reported as a scammer.
  5. The job sounds too good to be true. If the employer says that you can make your own hours or if the salary is excessively high compared to the normal rate you would earn, this might be a sign of a fake job post. Follow your gut!
  6. The job post looks unprofessional. Job posts that include poor spelling, grammatical errors, unrealistically high pay, vague descriptions, and low requirements should be treated with suspicion.

These are just a few tips but you should always scan the job posts with a little bit of skepticism. The red flags mentioned above do not guarantee that a job post is fake, but they should give you pause and initiate further research. Even if a job opportunity looks professional and legitimate, there are signs in the follow-up communication to watch out for:

  1. Emails are not well-written or professional. If an email from an employer has spelling, punctuation, or grammatical mistakes, that’s a red flag.
  2. Emails are sent from a personal email, not a company domain. You should be suspicious if you receive an email from a free email account like, Gmail, Hotmail, or Yahoo. Some email addresses may look like a company email, but are not. Try searching the email in Google to see if anyone else has reported it as a scammer. Be careful with company email addresses as well. The email domain should match the company website. For example, for SAP, it would be janesmith@sap.com – not janesmith@sap-inc.com or janesmith@sap-recruiting.com.
  3. You’re asked to provide personal information, like your bank account, social security number, or birth date. They may say they need your bank account for direct deposit or transfer funds, but you should never part with this information lightly. This puts you at incredible risk for identify theft.
  4. The header of the email contains suspicious information. Header lines are the first part of any email message before the body. The header lines contain information used to route message, including the subject, sender, recipient, the path an email takes, and its priority. Header lines are normally not shown raw and in full by email programs. Only certain information — the Subject line, sender and sent date, for instance — is displayed, formatted for easy use. When wondering the credibility of an email, it is a good idea to review these header lines, as they often will display suspicious information. For example, the header lines will reveal whether an email address has been forged. To learn how to display the header lines of an email, check out this helpful guide.
  5. You receive an offer without interviewing. No company will offer you a job without meeting you, no matter how impressive your resume is.
  6. The interview is oddly short or informal. Many scammers will interview you online or using an instant messaging service. Make sure you do some research before you agree to be interviewed. If you do accept the interview, be sure to ask detailed questions and never give out any personal information during the interview.
  7. The email doesn’t have a signature or has a pixelated company logo. Scammers will often copy logos from company websites.

If you are in any way suspicious, contact the company to verify that the person contacting you is an employee. Scammers will often pretend to represent real companies. Don’t overlook these signs because you are eager to find a job.

What do I do if I suspect fraudulent activity or if I am a victim of a scam?

First and foremost, if you have any suspicion at all, do not share any personal information with the individual or company. Second, be sure to notify the WorkConnect team by emailing contact@workconnect.io. Please forward or attach any phishing emails so that we can act immediately.

If you have already provided information during the job hunt process and you’re starting to worry, monitor your credit and bank accounts to ensure there are no signs of fraud. Review the warning signs of identity theft outlined by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).

If you suspect you have been a victim of identity theft, you should file a report with the FTC. You can also call the FTC Identity Theft Hotline at 1-877-438-4338 or TTY 1-866-653-4261. Visit https://www.usa.gov/identity-theft for more information.

How do I know if an email is really from the WorkConnect brand, and not a scammer posing as it?

Unfortunately, it is possible for a scammer to email you posing as the WorkConnect team. You should not release personal information over email during the job search process, and the WorkConnect team would NEVER ask for any. If you do receive such an email, please notify us immediately at contact@workconnect.io. This is a scammer and we will address the situation right away.

When you sign up on workconnect.io you will receive one email from WorkConnect by SAP (no-reply@workconnect.io) with the subject “Your Account has successfully been created.” You may also receive content from learning@sapdigital.com or replies to your inquiries from contact@workconnect.io. Any emails that are not from these email addresses or someone from SAP (which will have “@sap.com” in the email address), should be regarded with caution.

What information should not be shared in my job profile, resume, or CV?

As you know, the purpose of a CV or resume is to highlight your employment and academic history, as well as those qualifications that might “sell” you to potential employers. You need to include basic personal/contact information (name, city, email, phone number), but there are some details that you should never include on any job profile or resume/CV:

  • Social security number
  • Date of birth
  • Driver’s license information or state ID number
  • Full home address
  • Passport number
  • Insurance Numbers
  • National Identification Number
  • Marital status and number of children
  • Credit card or bank information
  • Weight and height
  • Discriminatory information – age, race, religion, sexual orientation
  • A photo of yourself

Contact Site Security

If you come across a suspicious or questionable posting on our site, and/or an email that you've received, please contact us at contact@workconnect.io.

Resources for Identity Theft & Fraud Security: